Do You Consider Hearing Music Will Help Us to be Effective Much Better?

There are lots of people who like to listen to music when they work and that i am considered one of them. I believe it is helps me focus more on the task at hand. Obviously I can imagine that there are people who listen to music because it helps them NOT to focus on their job.

Whilst there may be many reasons for wishing to listen to music in the workplace, can it really improve your productivity?

We know that music can alter your mood. Films have been using musical scores for years to create the right mood for a scene. At times you hardly notice the music at all but you are very receptive to the mood being conveyed. So can we use music to put us in a “productive” mood?

Research seems to support such a claim. For example, a trial where 75 out of 256 workers at a large retail company were issued with personal stereos to wear at work for four weeks showed a 10% increase in productivity for the headphone wearers. Other similar research conducted by researchers at the University of Illinois found a 6.3% increase when compared with the no music control group.

So if we accept that music does increase productivity, does it matter what types of music we listen to? Does all music have the same effect or are certain types better in certain circumstances?

If your goal is to increase your concentration then music which has a constant, easy beat and light melodies are recommended. These are said to be good for those trying to study as they help you pace your reading to aid focus and memorizing. Baroque music is reported as an excellent example, especially the works of Vivaldi, Bach and Handel.

Rock music can have a similar effect. According to a report in the journal Neuroscience of Behavior and Physiology, the Russian Academy of Sciences discovered that a person’s ability to recognize visual images, including letters and numbers, is faster when either rock or classical music is playing in the background.

If you are aiming to be more productive through being more relaxed, then you may be interested to learn that research has shown that music with an upbeat rhythm can reduce stress hormone levels by as much as 41%.

Some of the most publicized studies into whether listening to music increases productivity have centered on what has been termed the “Mozart effect”. The term got its name after a study showed that college students had performed better solving mathematical problems when listening to classical music. The effect of listening to Mozart does not appear to be limited to humans either. Apparently cows will produce more milk if Mozart is played.

There are lots of people who like to listen to music when they work and that i am considered one of them. I believe it is helps me focus more on the task at hand. Obviously I can imagine that there are people who listen to music because it helps them NOT to focus on their job.

Whilst there may be many reasons for wishing to listen to music in the workplace, can it really improve your productivity?

We know that music can alter your mood. Films have been using musical scores for years to create the right mood for a scene. At times you hardly notice the music at all but you are very receptive to the mood being conveyed. So can we use music to put us in a “productive” mood?

Research seems to support such a claim. For example, a trial where 75 out of 256 workers at a large retail company were issued with personal stereos to wear at work for four weeks showed a 10% increase in productivity for the headphone wearers. Other similar research conducted by researchers at the University of Illinois found a 6.3% increase when compared with the no music control group.

So if we accept that music does increase productivity, does it matter what types of music we listen to? Does all music have the same effect or are certain types better in certain circumstances?

If your goal is to increase your concentration then music which has a constant, easy beat and light melodies are recommended. These are said to be good for those trying to study as they help you pace your reading to aid focus and memorising. Baroque music is reported as an excellent example, especially the works of Vivaldi, Bach and Handel.

Rock music can have a similar effect. According to a report in the journal Neuroscience of Behavior and Physiology, the Russian Academy of Sciences discovered that a person’s ability to recognize visual images, including letters and numbers, is faster when either rock or classical music is playing in the background.

If you are aiming to be more productive through being more relaxed, then you may be interested to learn that research has shown that music with an upbeat rhythm can reduce stress hormone levels by as much as 41%.

Some of the most publicised studies into whether listening to music increases productivity have centred on what has been termed the “Mozart effect”. The term got its name after a study showed that college students had performed better solving mathematical problems when listening to classical music. The effect of listening to Mozart does not appear to be limited to humans either. Apparently cows will produce more milk if Mozart is played.

Incoming search terms for the article:

Questions you should ask On a First Date

Well, you may already know, going on the first date can be extremely scary and intimidating. Our minds are overcome with fear and insecurities and then we cave into those emotions.

We’re fearful of being rejected, we’re scared of failure, we’re nervous about saying an incorrect thing on the wrong time and we’re anxious of what our date will think about us.

Each one of these worries are totally human and completely understandable  however they produce devastating results: they paralyze us and greatly inhibit our capability to behave normally and confidently like we do with our family and with our closest friends.

Our personal fears bring us to the most uncomfortable situation where we presume an awful insufficient self confidence, all consumed with stress, angry and frustrated. The end result is that we’re doomed to end up in the most annoying, embarrassing and also humiliating situation, which we all believe as that “awkward silence”.

Contrary to popular belief, the majority of us will have the capability to handle on a fluid, easy-going and enjoyable conversation with others we’ve known for years so, using the right approach, it shouldn’t be different with the woman we’re on a first date with.

And the right approach is… conversation starters!

Preparing a listing of topics and questions which you can use on the first date can do wonders to your relationship abilities.

When you’ve got an arsenal of conversation starters  it’s quite simple to hold the conversation going.

You always have something to state, you build a lively conversation like there’s absolutely nothing to it, you’re not nervous, “stuck” or “blocked” and you will prevent the awkward silence disaster pretty easily.

Allow me to share 10 conversation starters that can be used on your own next first date:

·Has any book has a major have an effect on you?

·What was the top good deal you ever found?

·What’s probably the most irritating thing someone could do on a first date?

·What’s probably the most unusual thing you know the way to try and do?

·Is there anything you can’t say “no” to?

·What food could they not pay you enough to eat?

·Who are your cult heroes? Why?

·What was the craziest thing you ever did when you were a kid?

·If you might have any job in the world, what would it be?

·What would be the title of your biography?

There are various conversation starters that can be right for you fantastically. They can serve as a fantastic base for a flowing, lively, enjoyable conversation that can let your date learn about the “real you” when you leave all of the pressure, anxiety and fear behind you.

Don’t leave the house to go out on a first date empty-handed. Take a seat, prepare yourself some good conversation starters, memorize and exercise them and your chances to get a wonderful date will increase drastically

Incoming search terms for the article:

Do You Realize That You’re Living Someone Else’s Dream?

It’s no secret that your relationships with others are enriched when you learn to appreciate one another for the little things (not just the big stuff). The same goes for feeling enriched in the life you live – regardless of your circumstances. When you learn to continuously appreciate the “little” things in life, only then will you discover an indestructible inner peace within – one that money cannot buy.

This is most evident in people who are less fortunate and yet able to stay in good spirits. They’ve found a way to maintain inner peace regardless of their situation.

I’ve come to know that part of the journey to finding inner peace is to understand life is so much more than what’s happening in front of us. Just because we do not see it does not mean it isn’t there. Just because we do not feel it does not mean it isn’t happening. Your life, whether you believe this or not, is but only a dream for billions of people in this world.

Take thirty bucks for example: what’s thirty bucks to you? How do you spend thirty bucks in a single day?

Now, what if I told you, in most poverty stricken countries, thirty bucks can provide a child three nourishing meals a day, proper education and medical care for one full month?

In 1994, through World Vision, I sponsored a 5-year-old child in Zimbabwe, Africa, for thirty dollars a month. Her name was Lasi Sibanda. We stayed in touch by mail. However, four years ago, she sent me a letter expressing her deepest gratitude for my sponsorship. The funds have raised her well—she completed school and was working.

What I didn’t know was that the funds also helped her family become self-sufficient and in turn, were able to contribute in helping their community. They no longer needed my help. Instead, I was kindly led to sponsor 4-year-old Doreen Komunjumba in Uganda, Africa. It was then that I truly grasp the notion of what thirty dollars can do.

Lives can be empowered… A better future can take shape…

Sadly, many people think of the world as a compartmentalized entity that is made up of various countries. Some of these countries are rich, some poor. Some are over populated, and some under populated. Some are rich with natural resources, others are barren and infertile.

However, where we as individuals fit into this scheme, some may say it’s the luck of the draw and others may say it’s a choice we can make for this particular lifetime.

If you were born in a region of the world that happens to be rich with resources, or economically prosperous, you’re more likely to not worry about where to go for food, what disease you may die of tomorrow, or who will take care of you when you’re sick.

The reality is that we are all inhabitants of this single place called earth, and there is no reason why one person arbitrarily born in one country should live in poverty, while others born in another country live a relatively lavish lifestyle.

Imagine for a moment…if the world was one country. Then imagine that the world president started allocating land to all the citizens. How would you feel if you were randomly given a piece of land which turned out to be a desert barren of life, while your next door neighbor ended up on top of a gold mine? Obviously you would think it was unfair, right?

Well then imagine if your rich neighbor started using their wealth and influence to make your life even more difficult by taking what little resources you had, and polluting your environment. That is exactly what happens today between developed and undeveloped countries.

It is a fact that rich nations would not be wealthy if there were not poor nations to support us. We could not possibly afford our products if it wasn’t for people working in factories for less than a dollar a day, nor could we afford to feed ourselves if it wasn’t for the billions of people farming in developing countries for less than three hundred dollars a year.

We would not be able to buy prawns if it wasn’t for the tens of thousands of prawn farms in south east Asia and south America—as there is no way developed societies would allow this environmentally damaging practice to take place in our own backyard.

Examples like these are endless, but they show that the developed world’s standard of living, for the most part, is supported by the demise of others.

It is not one person that created the divide between the developed world and the developing world, nor can one person fix the issues. Therefore, we as “global citizens” all have a social and moral obligation to help each other to enable a safe and healthy life for all.

Keep this in mind when you’re ready to donate to a charity of your choice. After all, what does thirty bucks mean to you? A cheap sweater? Five Starbucks coffee? For the less fortunate, it means much more; it means a chance for health and education, hope for the future and a great reason to live.